Welcome to our 15th Harvest Week. Sept 17 (Wed Delivery)

Welcome to our 15th week of the 2014 Season

In Farm News this week, Farmer John Writes Delivery Challenges and Tillage Turnips

Delivery Challenges

After 6 1/2 years with us, our driver Lee Little decided to retire. Many of you have had the pleasure of interacting with this charismatic fellow over the years, and you know how dedicated he was to making the deliveries on time (often early). We had hoped Lee would finish out the year with us. It’s been a rocky transition to a new driver, but now we are set with a responsible, dedicated driver for the rest of the season, William Harriman, who has been employed on the farm in various capacities over the past few years. William is methodical and prompt, so we expect that our delivery system will soon be back to normal.

We take our shareholders’ schedules and standards for service very seriously. In case you are one of the unfortunate ones who went to your site and didn’t find a box because of a late delivery or a box mis-count, we extend our deepest apologies. We will of course make up any missed boxes if you let Shelly know at csa@angelicorganics.com.

Saturday, Sept 20: Fall Open House, featuring a Hay Ride to the Cows, Goats, Chickens and Horse at the Learning Center, and then to the Pumpkin Patch; also featuring a Farm Photo Booth, Early-Morning Bird Watching and a Tai Chi Performance

Farm Address: 1547 Rockton Road, Caledonia, IL 61011

Travel Note: With the I-90 construction from Elgin to the Rockton Road exit, expect that 45 mile portion of the drive to take over an hour. It’s usually extra busy here before 11, so we don’t recommend showing up early (unless you are coming for the birdwatching at 9 am). However, we do recommend showing up between 11 and 11:30, so you can take part in the hayrides before lunch.

9 AM (for birdwatchers only) Come early for birdwatching on Kinnikinnick Fields with Ornithologist Aaron Boone. Birdwatchers should plan to arrive by 9 AM and check-in at the farm. Ornithologist Aaron Boone will lead bird-watching from 9:30-10:30 AM

11 to 11:30: Arrive: park along the drive. Bring the kids (but unfortunately you can’t bring your pets.)

11:30 to 12:30: Mingling, Hayrides to the Farm Animals and then Pumpkin Picking; Flower and Basil Picking; also the Family Photo Booth: There will be hayrides before lunch hop on for a quick visit to the farm animals at the Learning Center and then off to the pumpkin and gourd patch. Pick flowers from our U-Pick Garden and a generous helping of tattered but usable basil from our fields, suitable at least for pesto. You’re welcome to a whole grocery bag of basil. You can also have a fun or formal family photo taken at our Family Photo Booth with Angelic Organics as your backdrop.

12:30 to 1:30: Potluck: please bring a large dish to pass

* The dishes at past open houses have always been phenomenal, but sometimes we run short on food. (This embarrassment happened at our last open house–this is not to occur on a farm that is all about food! Please bring a dish that will serve at least 15.

* Please bring the recipe that goes with your dish; recipes accompanying dishes are a hit. Put your name & your delivery site on the recipe, so admirers can track you down & lavish you with praise. (10 copies on 3×5 cards would be great.)

* Please bring your own place settings & beverage. We furnish some tables and chairs. Consider bringing a blanket on which to picnic, so we don’t have to provide so many chairs.

1:30 to 2:15: Tai Chi Demonstration/Introduction: (Shareholders are invited to join in.) Years ago, Elizabeth Wenscott, a loyal shareholder and very special soul, led a magnificent Tai Chi presentation at a farm open house to celebrate the shareholder acquisition of land adjacent to the farm. Elizabeth passed on this year, and the performance at our fall open house is in memory of Elizabeth.  The Tai Chi Center will present a Tai Chi Form and a Sword Form from 1:30 to 2 pm.  At 2 pm, interested shareholders and guests will be invited to take part in a brief introductory session of Tai Chi.

2 – 4 Family Farm Photo Booth: Another chance for a fun or formal family photo taken with Angelic Organics as your backdrop.

2:30 to 3:30: One More Hayride

Tillage Turnips Debut at Angelic Organics

Tillage turnips are creating quite a stir in farm fertility programs, even on conventional farms. They burrow deeply into the ground, loosening the soil and adding biomass. They are also thought to support plant health due to their production of glucosinolates, which fight soil born pests and pathogens. We seeded tillage radishes with alfalfa, clover, timothy, and Sudan grass in the spring. Some of the radishes have burrowed down more than a foot into our soil. We look forward to the benefits next year from these tillage radishes in our cover crops next year.

Spring seeded tillage radish

Spring seeded tillage radish

 

Pollo seeds tillage radishes into a field of seeded peas, September 3

Pollo seeds tillage radishes into a field of seeded peas, September 3

 

Our fall cover crop- peas and tillage turnips, Sept 11. (Tillage turnips are seeded into these pea fields, but are not yet visible.)

Our fall cover crop- peas and tillage turnips, Sept 11. (Tillage turnips are seeded into these pea fields, but are not yet visible.)

The Crops

Next week, weather permitting, we’ll harvest the fall beets, and a lot more potatoes, pie pumpkins and winter squash.

 

Pie pumpkins

Pie pumpkins

The Weather

Too much of a good thing is not a good thing. We’ve had way too much rain this year. The soil is waterlogged; harvesting is more difficult in muddy fields, and some crops, such as lettuce, chard, and beets, have suffered from foliar degradation. The beets will be fine, but there will be no beet greens. Many beds of lettuce have been planted for fall harvest; we believe the foliar problems in the lettuce will diminish with the cooler weather.

 

Broccoli has enjoyed the cool, wet weather this season

Broccoli has enjoyed the cool, wet weather this season

The Work

Lots of mud for the crew to trudge through.

U-Pick Garden

Our U-Pick Garden has flowers, and a few green beans.

More from Shareholders

Visit us often at www.facebook.com/angelicorganics, where we post exciting farm developments regularly, and shareholders post recipes, tips, and photos.

Box Contents

Please Note: this summary is written before you receive your box—please be aware that some guesswork is involved. As always, be sure to thoroughly wash all of your vegetables.

Baby Chard

Beets

Cabbage

Cilantro

Kale

An Onion

Hot Peppers

A Sweet Pepper

Potatoes

Acorn Squash

Spaghetti Squash

Upcoming Program at the Angelic Organics Learning Center

Say Cheese! A Cheesemaking Class for Families

Come to Angelic Organics Learning Center on Sunday, October 5th from 1 PM to 4 PM for this family-friendly hands-on workshop. We’ll introduce the process of cheesemaking from start to finish, from milking the goats to tasting fresh goat’s cheese. The class will feature ricotta and queso blanco. Please register for kids and parents ages 6 and up. $16 per person. Click here to register.

For more classes and workshops at the Learning Center, visit http://www.learngrowconnect.org/events

Warmly,

Farmer John and the Angelic Organics Farm Team

Welcome to our 14th Harvest Week. Sept 10 (Wed Delivery)

Welcome to our 14th week of the 2014 Season

In Farm News this week, Farmer John Invites You to our Open House on Saturday, September 20

Note on your Arugula

Arugula will perish quickly if stored wet in a plastic bag, if it appears moist, please do the following before storing it in the refrigerator: Fill a large bowl or dishpan with cold water. Add greens and swirl around vigorously. All the dirt and sand will sink to the bottom. Lift greens out of basin and into a salad spinner or colander. Spin greens to dry or drain as best you can and dry on towels. If you don’t have a spinner or colander, soak up the moisture with paper towels. Store washed and spun greens in a Ziploc bag or plastic container lined with a dry paper towel in the refrigerator. Cut greens perish more quickly if stored wet in a plastic bag. Consume the arugula within a few days of receiving it.

Saturday, Sept 20: Fall Open House, featuring a Hay Ride to the Cows, Goats, Chickens and Horse, and then to the Pumpkin Patch; also featuring a Tai Chi Performance

Farm Address: 1547 Rockton Road, Caledonia, IL 61011

Travel Note: With the I-90 construction from Elgin to the Rockton Road exit, expect that 45-mile portion of the drive to take over an hour. It’s usually extra busy here before 11, so we don’t recommend showing up early unless you are planning on participating in the birdwatching event at 9 am. However, we do recommend showing up between 11 and 11:30, so you can take part in the hayrides before lunch.

9 AM (for birdwatchers only) Come early for birdwatching on Kinnikinnick Fields with Ornithologist Aaron Boone. Birdwatchers should plan to arrive by 9 AM and check-in at the farm. Ornithologist Aaron Boone will lead bird-watching from 9:30-10:30 AM

11 to 11:30: Arrive: park along the drive. Bring the kids (but unfortunately you can’t bring your pets.)

11:30 to 12:30: Mingling, Hayrides to the Farm Animals and then Pumpkin Picking; Flower and Basil Picking; also the Family Photo Booth: There will be hayrides before lunch hop on for a quick visit to the farm animals at the Learning Center and then off to the pumpkin and gourd patch. Pick flowers from our U-Pick Garden and a generous helping of tattered but usable basil from our fields, suitable at least for pesto. You’re welcome to a whole grocery bag of basil. You can also have a fun or formal family photo taken at our Family Photo Booth with Angelic Organics as your backdrop.

All Sizes of Pumpkins

All Sizes of Pumpkins

Chicken Happiness

Chicken Happiness

12:30 to 1:30 ; Potluck: please bring a large dish to pass

* The dishes at past open houses have always been phenomenal, but sometimes we run short on food. (This embarrassment happened at our last open house–this is not to occur on a farm that is all about food! Please bring a dish that will serve at least 15.

* Please bring the recipe that goes with your dish; recipes accompanying dishes are a hit. Put your name & your delivery site on the recipe, so admirers can track you down & lavish you with praise. (10 copies on 3×5 cards would be great.)

* Please bring your own place settings & beverage. We furnish some tables and chairs. Consider bringing a blanket on which to picnic, so we don’t have to provide so many chairs.

1:30 to 2:15: Tai Chi Demonstration/Introduction: (Shareholders are invited to join in.) Years ago, Elizabeth Wenscott, a loyal shareholder and very special soul, led a magnificent Tai Chi presentation at a farm open house to celebrate the shareholder acquisition of land adjacent to the farm. Elizabeth passed on this year, and the performance at our fall open house is in memory of Elizabeth.  The Tai Chi Center will present a Tai Chi Form and a Sword Form from 1:30 to 2 pm.  At 2 pm, interested shareholders and guests will be invited to take part in a brief introductory session of Tai Chi.

2 – 4 Family Farm Photo Booth: Another chance for a fun or formal family photo taken with Angelic Organics as your backdrop.

2:30 to 3:30: One More Hayride

Hyrde

A Shareholder Writes about Our Open Houses

[Dear Angelic Organics Farmers],

After 8-9 years of being a shareholder, the Farm Open House still continues to be a highlight in our Summer & Fall with regards to our family outings! My friend Eileen & I with our children–we each have three, a total of six–and sometimes our husbands come and thoroughly enjoy & make good use of introducing our children to farm life! They are all great eaters except when they go through periods of complaining, but by and large, if Farmer John grows it, they have to try it & often they love the veggies! However, it gives them a great thrill to take a hay ride, milk goats, catch chickens, collect eggs, try goat milk ice cream, pick flowers & beans, as well as, picking pumpkins & gourds in the fall. Again, never a disappointment! We are also so lucky to try new & fantastic recipes from other shareholders during the potluck lunch. Loved the Dinosaur slaw from a fellow shareholder which is really kale slaw. We are always in need of more kale recipes! Anyway, we just want to say we are very grateful to our enthusiastic farm crew, staff, community, our fearless leader Farmer John and lastly to Rudolph Steiner who shared with the world such a deep understanding of the natural world and then shared his knowledge with us so that we can benefit from his wisdom in order to enrich our minds, bodies, & our souls!

Again, I mentioned to Farmer John how much I have enjoyed localthyme.com. It has been a great resource for me with regards to adding new recipes to my large repertoire!

Lastly, there was some talk about creating community at the meeting and although we come together as community at the Farm every year, there is very little interaction in our own individual communities. I would like to propose that maybe each site have a once-a-year potluck to be hosted by a member of the community. I am happy to host one for the LaGrange site. Is there any way to communicate or create a yahoo group or the like for each site? I would happily moderate a group like this for LaGrange, since I moderate another group locally, but suppose I would need the shareholders emails for the LaGrange Area to see if there is interest. Let me know your thoughts.

Thanks again!

Take good care,

Kristine Scott Schultz, July 24, 2013

Frolicking at an Open House

Frolicking at an Open House

The Crops

Winter squash, cabbage, carrots, potatoes, beets..lots on their way to your tables in the next few weeks. Tomatoes are winding down.

Tomato leaves are withering, but the tomatoes are still ripening

Tomato leaves are withering, but the tomatoes are still ripening

The Weather

Hot and wet.

The Work

We finished seeding cover crops in the evening on September 3, 2 days later than our goal, but a miraculous accomplishment, given how much it has been raining.

U-Pick Garden

Our U-Pick Garden is has flowers now, and still a few green beans.

More from Shareholders

Visit us often at www.facebook.com/angelicorganics, where we post exciting farm developments regularly, and shareholders post recipes, tips, and photos.

Box Contents

Please Note: this summary is written before you receive your box—please be aware that some guesswork is involved. As always, be sure to thoroughly wash all of your vegetables.

Arugula
Bunched Kale
Carrots
Kohlrabi
An Onion
Sweet Peppers
Dark Red Norland Potatoes
Tomatoes
Delicata Squash
Sweet Dumpling Squash

Upcoming Program at the Angelic Organics Learning Center

Family Worm Farm Workshop

You can make a wonderful organic fertilizer from your food scraps with help from some wiggly farm friends: worms! Bring your family to the farm on September 27th from 9 am to 12 pm for this fun workshop. We’ll provide everything you need to make your own worm bin, from the bins to the worms themselves. You’ll be making compost in the kitchen in no time! Click here to register. $45 per family.

LC1

LC2

For more workshop opportunities, visit www.learngrowconnect.org/events

Warmly,

Farmer John and the Angelic Organics Farm Team

Welcome to our 13th Harvest Week. Sept 3 (Wed Delivery)

Welcome to our 13th week of the 2014 Season and A Special Welcome to Back-to-School Shareholders Starting this Week!

In Farm News this week, Farmer John Shares an image that makes him Image Conscious

(Note: These two alerts below appear both in your weekly email and in Farm News. When a message is particularly important, it appears in both communications, to make sure it gets seen at least once.)

Ethylene Notice
We harvest our broccoli early morning when it is still cool. We frequently shuttle the bins to the packing area, where we ice the broccoli before storing it in a cooler with high humidity and a temperature just a few degrees above freezing. We pack it into your box and then it immediately goes into a refrigerated truck. Our goal is to take the utmost care of your broccoli, which includes timely harvesting and ideal storage conditions.

Broccoli with ice

Broccoli with ice

However, this season has created an unprecedented convergence of early fall broccoli with late summer tomatoes. Tomatoes produce ethylene; broccoli ripens and then yellows ultra-fast in an ethylene environment. While we are still in tomato season (1 or 2 more weeks), we will bag our broccoli and cauliflower that goes into your box. We don’t like using the extra plastic, but we prioritize the quality of your vegetables.

Potato Notice
As I’ve mentioned earlier in the season, we have a huge crop of potatoes. Some of our Yukon Golds have been afflicted by hollowheart, a discoloring of the potato flesh, probably due to the abnormally wet season.  From http://www.tourismpei.com/index.php3?number=12345  “Hollowheart is a discoloured cavity in the centre of an otherwise healthy potato. It can be caused by rapid growth or possibly by sudden temperature changes early in the growing season. This condition doesn’t affect taste or nutritional value of potatoes. These potatoes can be eaten but the hollow heart should be cut out. If you find a hollow centre in your baked potato, just remove the brown area before serving.”

The majority of the Yukon Golds are fine, but we are giving you a heads-up to inspect your Yukon Gold potatoes once you slice them open, and cut around any hollowheart you find. If you receive red potatoes, you probably will encounter no hollowheart conditions.

We don’t wash your potatoes. They store better when they are not washed.

Farm Open House Saturday, September 20
Keep your calendar open for our fall open house. Everyone can go on a hayride and pick a pumpkin and some gourds that day. There will also be a Tai Chi performance in memory of longterm friend, shareholder and farm advocate Elizabeth Wenscott. We’re still lining up other activities, so stay tuned.

Image Conscious
Someone took my image

FJ-1

 

 

 

 

 

 

and distorted it below in a Monsanto poster mock-up.

568 × 413 - thetruthisnow.com

thetruthisnow.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Not very nice (or legal) to do this, but it’s almost impossible to do anything about it without a lot of expensive legal clout, plus I am too busy farming. I did, however, send an email asking the host of the page to get back to me. We’ll see if that goes anywhere. (Interesting when people use underhanded tactics to attempt to promote positive change.)

The Crops

Pollo fills the seeder with fall peas

Pollo fills the seeder with seeds for our fall cover crops

The Weather

Pollo races the rain as he seeds fall cover crops (peas)

Pollo races the rain as he seeds fall cover crops (peas)

The Work
The farm work has been breathtaking, because unusual late August fall rains have interfered with our usual transplanting and seeding of fall crops and our cover cropping program. We had a dry weather window this past week, and we flew into action. Almost all of the fall crops are now in, and well over half the cover crops are seeded. Phew!

Aracelli ices the kale

Araceli ices the kale

U-Pick Garden
Our U-Pick Garden has flowers, and still a few green beans.

More from Shareholders
Visit us often at www.facebook.com/angelicorganics, where we post exciting farm developments regularly, and shareholders post recipes, tips, and photos

Box Contents
Please Note: this summary is written before you receive your box—please be aware that some guesswork is involved. As always, be sure to thoroughly wash all of your vegetables.

Arugula
Broccoli
Cauliflower
Chard
Onions
Peppers
Potatoes
Heirloom Tomatoes
Tomatoes
Winter Squash

Upcoming Program at the Angelic Organics Learning Center
Homebrewing 101 on Sunday, September 21 from 1 PM – 4:30 PM: Beginners will learn the basic steps of homebrewing with Nate Peterson of Wishful Acres Farm.  We’ll demonstrate primary and secondary fermentation, and everyone will try their hand at bottling their own. You’ll learn what equipment you’ll need to do this at home, plus where to find the best ingredients, including how to grow, harvest and prepare your own hops.

LC-1For more classes and workshops at the Learning Center,  visit http://www.learngrowconnect.org/events

Warmly,
Farmer John and the Angelic Organics Farm Team

Welcome to our 12th Harvest Week. Aug 27 (Wed Delivery)

Welcome to our 12th Harvest Week

In Farm News this week, Farmer John Writes about When the 2015 Season Really Begins

Farm Open House Saturday, September 20

Keep your calendar open for our fall open house. Everyone can go on a hayride and pick a pumpkin and some gourds that day. There will also be a Tai Chi performance in memory of longterm friend, shareholder and farm advocate Elizabeth WenscottWe’re still lining up other activities, so stay tuned.

The Crops

Columns of Heirloom Tomatoes

Columns of Heirloom Tomatoes

Broccoli came on crazily fast this season. We usually can time the distribution of broccoli into your box according to when we seed it, but this year, with the extraordinary weather, the pace of maturation dramatically accelerated. We don’t like to hold the broccoli; we like to give it to you fresh, so you will get 2 to 3 lovely heads of broccoli this week.

The Weather

Aug 23- 2nd huge storm this week, interspersed with light showers and drizzle

Aug 23- 2nd huge storm this week, interspersed with light showers and drizzle

 

The Work: When the 2015 Season Really Begins

Half of our fields are out of production each year–38 fields. They are in cover crops–legumes, tillage radishes and grasses–in preparation for the following two years of production. Many of the fields that our shareholders will be eating from in 2015 were taken out of production in 2013 to build up their fertility for 2015. (It’s a little more complicated than this, but this short tutorial is adequate to create an approximate picture of how our farming approach spans large reaches of time.) I said recently that “farming is about farming time at least as much as it is about farming soil.”

Farmer John tours the fields that are worked up for 2015, soon to be seeded to peas and tillage radishes.

Farmer John tours the fields that are worked up for 2015, soon to be seeded to peas and tillage radishes.

By mid-August (now), we start pushing hard to get our 2015 fields laid out and prepared for the next season. Our goal is to have all these fields converted from long term cover crops to short term cover crops by September 1. We almost always achieve this lofty goal. We subsoil and rotovate the standing alfalfa, clover and timothy to work it into the ground, apply compost, spray with Biodynamic preparations, and then seed the ground to peas and, in some cases, tillage radishes. Peas provide nitrogen and biomass; tillage radishes burrow down into the earth, creating a more porous, flocculant soil structure. The peas and radishes winterkill, providing ready-made beds to plant into early the following spring.

Here’s a video of our cover cropping in late August, 2012, a similar program to today:

The process of cover cropping is capital-, labor-, and time-intensive. Having land out of production for half the time is in itself very capital intensive, as it has to be mowed every 10 days or so during the growing season (to control weeds), sprayed with Biodynamic preparations, and maybe spread with rock powders, while producing no salable crop during that two year period. Yes, it could be hayed, but I don’t want the plant nutrients trucked off the farm. I want all the biomass that we produce here through cover crops to stay here and build up our soil, so that you can eat more plentiful and more nutritious food from our farm.

Farmer John discusses cover crops with the King and Prime Minister of Uganda, 1999

Farmer John discusses cover crops with the King and Prime Minister of Uganda, 1999

(Read the story about the King’s visit: angelicorganics.com/thekingsvisit

At Angelic Organics, we give our cover crop program equal priority to our seeding and harvesting. Our program pays off in more fertile land with better soil structure, and healthier, more bountiful crops. As we work in the present to reap the rewards of the past, we are also creating a bountiful future to bring towards us into the present. This leads to boxes brimming with fresh organic vegetables and herbs, week after week, year after year.

So when does our 2015 season start? It started in early 2013, with the seeding of alfalfa, clover, timothy, sudan grass and tillage radishes. Our 2016 season started early this year.

Clover and Alfalfa- Farmer John stands in his favorite crop, 1990's

Clover and Alfalfa- Farmer John stands in his favorite crop, 1990’s

U-Pick Garden

Our U-Pick Garden is flourishing with lots of flowers available now, and maybe a few green beans.

More from Shareholders

Visit us often at www.facebook.com/angelicorganics, where we post exciting farm developments regularly, and shareholders post recipes, tips, and photos.

Box Contents

Please Note: this summary is written before you receive your box—please be aware that some guesswork is involved. As always, be sure to thoroughly wash all of your vegetables.

Lettuce
Broccoli
Kale
Garlic
Onions
A Leek
Tomatoes
Dill

Upcoming Program at the Angelic Organics Learning Center

Family Farm Tour and Hayride on Saturday, September 13 from 10am-3pm: Join us for a day of learning and fun on the farm! We’ll tour the farm on a hayride, then spend time with the goats, chickens, pigs, cows and more. Hint: If you can’t make the shareholder open house, this is a great alternative! Bring a sack lunch and pre-register for kids and adults ages 3 and up.

AOLC 1

More information and registration at www.learngrowconnect.org/events.

Warmly,

Farmer John

Welcome to our 11th Harvest Week. Aug 20 (Wed Delivery)

Welcome to our 11th Harvest Week


In Farm News this week, Farmer John Writes about Our Acre(s)

Katie puts the final touch on your box

Katie puts the final touch on your box

Your Box
The swap box at your delivery site serves as a trading place–you leave an item in the swap box that you don’t care for and swap it for something that you’d prefer. Remember to give others the chance to reap any bounties, too!

Be sure to use the check-off sheets when picking up your shares! This helps your host and us to identify any orphan boxes.

If you’re unable to pick up your box one week, we ask that you arrange to have someone else pick up for you. Make sure to forward your pickup instructions to that person, so he or she doesn’t return with a fruit box or a swap box instead of a vegetable box…yup, this happens.

For Flex Share folks–we can make changes to your Flex schedule. However, we  ask that you give us 2 weeks notice in order to make the change on time.

For Full and Half Share folks–when it’s not possible to find someone to pick up for you, we can hold back your box that week. We ask for a 2 week advance notice on this. We can make this box up to you during a future delivery, but it will need to be for your scheduled pick up day/week.

For Half Shares–we cannot alternate your pick up week from your originally scheduled dates.

The Crops

Juan Luis and Angel hand large bulbs of White Porcelain German garlic to Raul.

Juan Luis and Angel hand large bulbs of White Porcelain German garlic to Raul.

Amongst numerous other items, Garlic, tomatoes, cilantro, and peppers will be in your box this week…a nice combination.

Cucumbers and zucchini/summer squash are done, as is typical for this time of year.

Melons are finished. They started out great, but the incessant rains made it a mediocre year for melons.

This is the last week of sweet corn — the corn crop was beyond fabulous.

Will with a typical ear of sweet corn. (18 long rows of kernels circle the cob; 14 or 16 rows are typical.)

Will with a typical ear of sweet corn. (18 long rows of kernels circle the cob; 14 or 16 rows are typical.)

Broccoli is coming on this week — earlier than usual.

Potatoes and winter squash will soon by in your box.

The Weather
The weather continues to be strangely cool.

The Work
Last week, I described how our onion tumbler pops the onions out of the ground and lays them in windrows for curing. After they cure in the summer air (typically a 2 – 5 day process) we pick them up with our onion harvester, which tops the stalks with whirring knives, and elevates them into wooden cribs. When things go right, which they did this past Thursday, 3 of us can harvest in 2 hours what it would probably take 20 people a day or so to harvest by hand.

Our Acre(s)
Former growing manager Bob Bower bought the onion harvester at the same auction where he bought the onion tumbler. It was built for large scale onion production in the 60’s. Like most commercial vegetable equipment built then, it is woefully undersized and obsolete for today’s commercial production of onions. When Bob was bidding on it, the farmer next to him asked, “how many acres of onions do you grow?” Bob said, “between 1 and 2.” The farmer said, “between 1 and 2 hundred?” Bob didn’t answer him.  Bob told me later, “I figured I’d just let him think whatever he wanted.”

We grow between 1 and 2 acres of onions.

Pollo drives the onion wagon. Primo monitors the harvest. Farmer John drives the John Deere. Irrigation is going in the upper right.

Pollo drives the onion wagon. Primo monitors the harvest. Farmer John drives the John Deere. Irrigation is going in the upper right.

Then we stack the onion cribs to form an air tunnel, and blow air through it for a couple of weeks. Then we refrigerate them until they go into your box. (A few of these storage onions, especially the red ones which have a shorter shelf life, bypass the tunnel and go into your box fresh from the field.)

Onion cribs in curing tunnel in greenhouse with high powered fan. Tarp prevents onion sunscald.

Onion cribs in curing tunnel in greenhouse with high powered fan. Tarp prevents onion sunscald.

U-Pick Garden
Our U-Pick Garden is coming on, with lots of flowers available now, and a few green beans.

More from Shareholders
Visit us often at www.facebook.com/angelicorganics, where we post exciting farm developments regularly, and shareholders post recipes, tips, and photos.

Box Contents
Please Note: this summary is written before you receive your box—please be aware that some guesswork is involved. As always, be sure to thoroughly wash all of your vegetables.

Lettuce
Kale
A Carrot
Celery
An Onion
Garlic
Eggplant
Peppers
Summer Squash/Zucchini
Sweet Corn
Tomatoes
Cilantro

Warmly,
Farmer John

Welcome to our 10th Harvest Week. Aug 13 (Wed Delivery)

Welcome to our 10th Harvest Week

In Farm News this week, Farmer John Writes about a Mystery Machine
Your Box
Your Box

If you’re unable to pick up your box, or want to change your delivery site:

If you’re unable to pick up your box one week, we ask that you arrange to have someone else pick up for you. Make sure to forward your pickup instructions to that person, so he or she doesn’t return with a fruit box or a swap box instead of a vegetable box…yup, this happens.

For Flex Share folks–we can make changes to your Flex schedule. However, we ask that you give us 2 weeks notice in order to make the change on time.

For Full and Half Share folks–when it’s not possible to find someone to pick up for you, we can hold back your box that week. We ask for a 2 week advance notice on this. We can make this box up to you during a future delivery, but it will need to be for your scheduled pick up day/week.

For Half Shares–we cannot alternate your pick up week from your originally scheduled dates.

The Crops
Our tomatoes are subject to similar foliar problems this year as the melons, due to torrential rains and very high humidity throughout June and into July. The extent of this condition did not become very apparent in the tomatoes until the past couple of weeks. So, we will only have a pretty good tomato crop, not a stellar tomato crop. Fortunately, our other crops are making up for any tomato volume that will be lost, so your box will continue to be very full.

Sunday Dinner

Sunday Dinner

About tomatoes, in some years the yields have surged to such a degree that we have put as many as 19 into a box — 2 paper bags stuffed full of regular tomatoes, plus an heirloom tomato or two. We don’t intend such huge tomato yields; they just happen, especially in dry years with low humidity. (We irrigate our tomatoes with drip tape, so we never bring moisture to the leaves with our irrigation method, but we cannot protect tomato leaves against rain and high humidity.) If we had a huge tomato crop this year, they would not fit into your box, because so many of the other crops are yielding so well.

Cucumbers and zucchini/summer squash are almost done, as is typical for this time of year. We’ve had a good run with both. We have an excellent pepper crop and eggplant crop. We decided to back off on the pepper harvest this week, to let them size up more.

This week and next week will be the final weeks for corn. We’ve enjoyed a gigantic crop of very sweet corn with very large ears.

Our Fall Broccoli, Cabbage, Cauliflower and Brussels Sprouts. We'll have broccoli in early September.

Our Fall Broccoli, Cabbage, Cauliflower and Brussels Sprouts. We’ll have broccoli in early September.

The Weather
The weather continues to be strangely cool, with nighttime temperatures often in the 50’s.

The Work and the Mystery Machine
Several years ago, former growing manager Bob Bower Skyped me in Russia and said “there’s an odd-looking thing for sale at an auction of vegetable equipment nearby. I don’t know what it is.”

I said, “sounds pretty good. I suggest you buy it if it goes for under $150. We’ll figure out what it does.” (I suppose this says something about my weakness for farm machinery.)

Onion Tumbler

Onion Tumbler

Bob bought it and it turned out to be an onion tumbler. Well, we named it the onion tumbler, but I suppose its name is more properly onion lifter. It has a square 1 1/4 inch bar that glides along an inch or so under the standing onions while it spins very fast, popping the onions out of their bed and laying them down on the ground, where they will field cure for a few days.

Tumbled Onions, Field Curing

Tumbled Onions, Field Curing

Next Week
In next week’s issue of Farm News, I’ll show you the machine that harvests the onions and the wind tunnels where we cure the onions.

U-Pick Garden
Our U-Pick Garden is coming on, with beans, and flowers available now.

More from Shareholders
Visit us often at www.facebook.com/angelicorganics , where we post exciting farm developments regularly, and shareholders post recipes, tips, and photos.

Box Contents
Please Note: this summary is written before you receive your box—please be aware that some guesswork is involved. As always, be sure to thoroughly wash all of your vegetables.

Lettuce
Chard
A Storage Onion
A Sweet Onion
A Leek
Eggplant
Cucumbers
Zucchini/Summer Squash
A Melon
Sweet Corn
Tomatoes
Hot Peppers
Parsley

Programs at the Angelic Organics Learning Center

This Saturday, August 16, visit the farm for two fun family events

Home-milked Ice cream

Home-milked Ice cream! Saturday, August 16, 10am-12pm: Together, we’ll milk the goats, visit the beehive, and look for fruit around our organic farm. Then, we’ll make up a batch of home-grown, homemade ice cream. We’ll even get to eat this sweet treat together. Yum! $11 per person. Pre-register on our website: http://learngrowconnect.org/event/home-milked-ice-cream

Kids with Cob
Kids with Cob! Saturday, August 16, 1pm-4pm: Come cooperate with others to construct a mini eco-village while learning natural building techniques.  Use your hands to build model homes using a mixture of clay, sand and straw, called “cob”, then use your imagination to create stories about people in the community.  Perfect for kids who love to get dirty, as well as those who love building things. $12 per person. Pre-register on our website: http://learngrowconnect.org/event/kids-cob

More information and registration at www.learngrowconnect.org/events.

Sign up for a hands-on farm workshop now at www.learngrowconnect.org/events

Warmly,
Farmer John

Welcome to our 9th Harvest Week. Aug 6 (Wed Delivery)

A Special Welcome in our 9th Week to our Peak Season Shareholders!

In Farm News this week, Farmer John Writes what his Mother said about Potatoes.

Please sign up for your free recipe service at  www.localthyme.net/register . Enter the farm code AOLTFREE under “My Farm Sent Me A Code.” The service is customized for each week’s box, and will help to make sure nothing in your box goes to waste.

Your Box
Please fold your boxes flat and return them to your delivery site.  When folding the box, be careful not to rip the tabs that help hold the box together. Thank you.
Here’s how to fold your box: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-37m7Trp9oM

The Crops

Melons
Our watermelons, muskmelons and honeydews have matured unevenly, due to excessive moisture causing early dieback of the vines. Many of the melons are superb; some are under-ripe. The team is doing the best they can to provide you with a sweet, ripe melon, but if the melon you receive is not sweet and ripe, our sincere apologies. You’ll probably get a sweet one the following week. What to do if you get an unripe melon?  Local Thyme makes a suggestion this week for just such an occasion.

Other Crops
Best garlic crop ever. Best onion crop. Best corn crop. I don’t know how the farm keeps growing better crops every year, and, of course, not all the crops are better this year. The melons, basil and some of the lettuce have taken a beating from the rain and the humidity. But, overall, it’s an astounding year for crops. On that note, I’m going to give the potatoes their own heading.

Do You Like Potatoes? My Mother said You Do.
Our clay soil is not the greatest for growing potatoes. And organic potatoes are prone to all sorts of insect and fungal disease pressure that could be readily mitigated on a conventional farm. Therefore, I always plant enough acreage for a moderate crop of potatoes, knowing that the yields might come in well below my expectations, or possibly well above. This past week, we did a yield projection by weighing the potatoes from 2 plants of each variety.

My mother often said, “people like potatoes.” I hope you like potatoes. It’s our best potato crop ever.

Potatoes in Bloom

Potatoes in Bloom

Garlic cures in the field. You'll receive a garlic bulb in your box soon.

Garlic cures in the field. You’ll receive a garlic bulb in your box soon.

The Weather

The cool and moist weather this season played an essential role in the size and quality of these sweet onions.

The cool and moist weather this season played an essential role in the size and quality of these sweet onions.

The Work

Weeding Kale. Technology has not yet replaced all the work that needs to be done in the world.

Weeding Kale. Technology has not yet replaced all the work that needs to be done in the world.

U-Pick Garden
Our U-Pick Garden has plenty of flowers this week (including sunflowers) for beautiful boquets.

More from Shareholders
Visit us often at www.facebook.com/angelicorganics , where we post exciting farm developments regularly, and shareholders post recipes, tips, and photos.

Box Contents
Please Note: this summary is written before you receive your box—please be aware that some guesswork is involved. As always, be sure to thoroughly wash all of your vegetables.

Lettuce
Oregano
A Hot Pepper
Bell Peppers
Cauliflower
Sweet Onions
Zucchini/Summer Squash
Cucumbers
Melons
Beets
Eggplant
Sweet Corn
Tomatoes

Programs at the Angelic Organics Learning Center
Two totally great tomato workshops are coming up! They’re are perfect for gardeners and CSA shareholders.

  • Food Preserving 101 is great for folks who need some fresh ideas for keeping up with their veggie bounty. On August 17 from 1pm-5pm, we’ll learn to can tomatoes, and cover dehydrating and freezing as well.
  • At Introduction to Seed-Saving, we’ll save seed from tomatoes, talk basics for saving seed from other crops , and learn how to plan your garden for best seed-saving results. Join us on August 23 from 9am-12:30pm for this hands-on workshop.

More information and registration at www.learngrowconnect.org/events .

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Sign up for a hands-on farm workshop now at www.learngrowconnect.org/events .

Warmly,
Farmer John

Welcome to our 8th Harvest Week. July 30 (Wed Delivery)

Welcome to our 8th Harvest Week!

Farmer John Writes about the Season and the Crops these Days

Our Season's Self Expression

Our Season’s Self Expression

The Peak-of-Summer Crops

Mysteries of Melons Our watermelons, muskmelons and honeydews have matured unevenly, due to excessive moisture causing early dieback of the vines. Many of the melons are superb; some are under-ripe. Normally, our veteran farm team can tell the difference between ripe and under-ripe from how the melon appears, but this year, the under-ripe melons look similar to the ripe ones. This is a quandary. The team is doing the best they can to provide you with a sweet, ripe melon, but if the melon you receive is not sweet and ripe, our sincere apologies. You’ll probably get a sweet one the following week. We’ll have a smaller melon crop than usual, but due to how well our other crops are doing, your box will still be full.

What to do if you get an unripe melon?  Local Thyme offers a recipe this week for just such an occasion. Sign up at  www.localthyme.net/register . Enter the farm code AOLTFREE under “My Farm Sent Me A Code.”

Other Heavy Hitters
Sweet Corn Once again, we are enjoying a fabulous corn crop, with large, well-pollinated ears filled out to the tips. Even the corn that got knocked flat by a wind storm a month ago stood back up and produced large ears. I suppose we humans could learn a lesson from such (not that we all want to produce large ears.)

Tomatoes – patience….they’ll be a substantial presence in your box soon; Cucumbers…oh, my…they are on a roll; Peppers, Eggplant…very lush, just starting to produce.

Tomatoes are poking along prettily.

Tomatoes are poking along prettily.

The Weather
Very hot and humid in the beginning of last week. Temperatures finally reached the 90’s…tough on the crew, good for a lot of the crops. Then temperatures were milder for the rest of the week.

If I call a farmer halfway across the country to inquire about a piece of his equipment for sale, the first thing to get out of the way is how the weather and crops are at both ends of the conversation. Back when I often spent time in Mexico, my mom would send me newspaper clippings about the weather back home, often accompanied by newspaper photos of someone’s crops; I read these stories with great interest. Up until the 60’s or so, it was common for families to drive around on Sunday afternoons looking at their neighbors’ crops.

The Work
An astounding amount of work is required to keep things going properly on a farm like this. This past week, we harvested and packed 20 tons of vegetables and herbs, weeded, irrigated, mowed, trellised, seeded, transplanted, built compost, repaired equipment, and helped to host a gala Farm Dinner Benefit for the Angelic Organics Learning Center, attended by 250 people.

Primo and Pollo repair the motor on our delivery truck's refrigeration unit

Primo and Pollo repair the motor on our delivery truck’s refrigeration unit

 

The Fun

Fancy Farm Dinner for the Benefit of the Angelic Organics Learning Center--quite a contrast to the work by Primo and Pollo in the photo above.

Fancy Farm Dinner for the Benefit of the Angelic Organics Learning Center–quite a contrast to the work by Primo and Pollo in the photo above.

U-Pick Garden
Our U-Pick Garden is coming on, with beans, peas, and flowers available now.

Braden and Bennet Rogers brandish beans in the U-Pick

Braden and Bennet Rogers brandish beans in the U-Pick

Box Contents
Please Note: this summary is written before you receive your box—please be aware that some guesswork is involved. As always, be sure to thoroughly wash all of your vegetables.

Lettuce
A Hot Pepper
Sweet Corn
Zucchini/Summer Squash
Cucumbers
Sweet Onions
Melons
Tomatoes
Beets
Thyme
A Bell Pepper

Farm Dreams and Wild Edibles come to the Learning Center this August
We’ve got lots of exciting on-farm opportunities happening next month at the Learning Center. Here are two you might enjoy:

  • If you’ve ever considered starting your own farm, Farm Dreams is the class for you. Three new farmers will share their stories, you’ll identify challenges and next steps, and learn more about the available farmer training resources from experienced facilitator Sheri Doyel. Register on our website: www.learngrowconnect.org/events
  • Head out of the city and into the woods to find wild food this summer. At our Wild Edibles of Late Summer workshop, you’ll not only learn to identify plants like bee balm, wild grapes, and elderberry, you’ll also learn how to prepare them. It’s happening on Sunday, August 10 from 2pm-5pm. Register on our website: www.learngrowconnect.org/events

AOLC 1AOLC 2

Sign up for a hands-on farm workshop now at www.learngrowconnect.org/events

Warmly,
Farmer John

Welcome to our 7th Harvest Week. July 23 (Wed Delivery)

Welcome to our 7th Harvest Week!

Farmer John Writes about Farming by Satellite

The open house was a fabulous event.  The Selfish Giant was a huge hit. So was the dessert table. Thanks to all who showed up to visit your farm.

The Crops

Basil Heads-Up
This week’s basil is somewhat battered from the heavy storms this season. It still smells great and it will at least make a great pesto.

Mysteries of Watermelon
Our watermelons have matured unevenly, due to the excessive moisture. Many are superb; some are under-ripe. Normally, our veteran farm team can tell the difference between ripe and under-ripe from how the melon appears, but this year, the under-ripe melons look similar to the ripe ones. This is a quandary. The team is doing the best they can to provide you with a sweet, ripe melon, but if the melon you receive is not sweet and ripe, our sincere apologies. You’ll probably get a sweet one the following week.

Mysteries of The Box
Sometimes an unfamiliar item might show up in your box. What to do?  Sign up with Local Thyme. We receive many raves about the free Local Thyme Recipe service. Sign up at  http://www.localthyme.net/register . Enter the farm code AOLTFREE under “My Farm Sent Me A Code.”

The Weather
It finally stopped raining for a few days. The cool overcast weather has been a blessing for the crew.

The sky is always telling a story.

The sky is always telling a story.

The Work
I said to Primo, “are you going to be able to get to that wiring on the milkhouse project?”

He winced. “The pickup has a hole in the gas tank and the electrical connector is shot; I have to go get a new tank and connector. The battery on the Fordson lost its charge; I’m charging it and have to diagnose it. The delivery truck started to leak hydraulic oil again; I have to take the connections apart and seal them. I have to cut the delivery slip sheets in time for the pack today.”

By this time, we were laughing.

Primo and Pollo inspect an irrigation leak.

Primo and Pollo inspect an irrigation leak.

U-Pick Garden
Our U-Pick Garden is coming on, with beans, peas, and some flowers available now.

More from Shareholders
Visit us often at www.facebook.com/angelicorganics , where we post exciting farm developments regularly, and shareholders post recipes, tips, and photos.

 

Box Contents

Please Note: This summary is written before you receive your box—please be aware that some guesswork is involved. As always, be sure to thoroughly wash all of your vegetables.

Sweet Corn
Lettuce
Arugula
Cucumbers
Zuchinni/Summer Squash
Sweet Peppers
Basil
Anise
A Sweet Onion
Watermelon
Beets

GPS RTK (Real Time Kinematic) Navigation
Taking a cue from our ancestors who looked to the heavens to navigate, we receive guidance from a celestial body to lay out our fields. (I’ve written about our navigation system in other years, but I want to offer a reminder in this column.) Due to our tractor’s triangulated satellite RTK guidance system, all of our growing beds are laid out to a tolerance of about one inch, meaning that our tractor tires and our growing beds never deviate by more than an inch off the grid. This means that we don’t compact our soil in the 48″ wide area where our crops grow. This results in better aeration of the growing area, more water permeability, and a looser soil for roots to penetrate. It also allows us to work the soil earlier after a rain, a huge benefit in a year like this one.

We can work the soil earlier for two reasons: 1) we are not compacting it by driving over the growing area of the bed (soil is very susceptible to compaction when wet); and 2) the narrow area where the tractor tires go is compacted from our tractor going exactly in that path previously, so the harder compact strip of ground between the beds keeps our tractor from sinking.

The windows between the rains have been extremely narrow this year, with more than twice the normal rainfall in June. We go into the fields as soon as they are dry enough to work. With our RTK system, this means sometimes we can get into the fields more than a day earlier than if we didn’t have it. Then we move very fast.

What rain? All Primo sees is dust. Dome with antenna on top of tractor cab is the RTK receiver.

What rain? All Primo sees is dust. Dome with antenna on top of tractor cab is the RTK receiver.

Perfectly straight rows, no soil compaction, enhanced soil structure, thanks to our GPS RTK guidance system.

Perfectly straight rows, no soil compaction, enhanced soil structure, thanks to our GPS RTK guidance system.

Registration is still open for Permaculture Design Certificate Course at the Angelic Organics Learning Center
The Learning Center is excited to offer this unique course to our community. Permaculture is an ecological design system for more sustainable lives and communities. It combines sustainable agriculture, natural building, water management, community development and more. Join as we learn to better care for the earth and be a contributing part of a resilient ecosystem.

Permaculture Design 1

Permaculture Design 2Sign up for a hands-on farm workshop now at  www.learngrowconnect.org/events

Warmly,
Farmer John

Welcome to our 6th Harvest Week. July 16 (Wed Delivery)

Welcome to our 6th Harvest Week!

Farmer John invites you to our Open House, Saturday, July 19, featuring Farm Travel Adventures and The Selfish Giant, a Free Puppet Play by Blair Thomas. He also invites you to the Annual Farm Dinner Benefitting the Angelic Organics Learning Center on Saturday, July 26. See details below.

The Weather

The season has been cool so far. But, as they say about the stock market, past performance is no indication of future results. With weather and markets (and life), anything can happen.

The Work

Primo (left) and Pollo (not shown) upgraded our cucumber harvester with a walkway and harvest bucket hangers, cutting cucumber harvest time almost in half. Hovering over the vines, instead of trampling them to find the cucumbers, results in longer lasting vines and greater yields, plus, it's easier on or crew.

Primo (left) and Pollo (not shown) upgraded our cucumber harvester with a walkway and harvest bucket hangers, cutting cucumber harvest time almost in half. Hovering over the vines, instead of trampling them to find the cucumbers, results in longer lasting vines and greater yields, plus, it’s easier on or crew.

The Crops…

Zucchini and summer squash are in full swing. Cucumber harvest quantities will double in the next couple of weeks. Sweet corn, melons, peppers, eggplant will soon be in your box. Tomatoes know no shame…have yet to blush.

Emily and Jay Discuss Food Security Leeks

Emily and Jay Discuss Food Security Leeks

More from Shareholders

Visit us often at www.facebook.com/angelicorganics , where we post exciting farm developments regularly, and shareholders post recipes, tips, and photos.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Join us at Our 7th Annual Peak Harvest Farm Dinner Benefit for the Angelic Organics Learning Center Saturday, July 26, 2014 4:30 to 9:00 pm

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Presented by premier Chicago and Rockford chefs, including Chef Paul Virant.

We’ll enjoy a five-course gourmet meal made with seasonal produce fresh from Angelic Organics and other sustainable, local ingredients.

Jeep rides by Farmer John. Live Music. Farm Tours. It’s going to be fun!

All proceeds from the Farm Dinner support our educational programs that build the local food system..

www.learngrowconnect.org/farmdinner

Saturday, July 19: Summer Open House at Angelic Organics, featuring a Puppet Play and Farm Travel Adventures

Note: With the I-90 construction from Elgin to the Rockton Road exit, expect that 45 mile portion of the drive to take over an hour.

11 to 12:30: Arrive (park along the drive), Mingling, Hayrides, Puppet Show & Farm Travel Bring the kids (but unfortunately you can’t bring your pets). There will be hayrides before lunch– hop on to the fields and see everything growing. Travel the farm. See a puppet show. Pick peas, beans and flowers in our U-Pick Garden. (It’s usually extra busy here before 11, so we don’t recommend showing up early.)

11:30 – 12:15: The Selfish Giant Puppet Play in the Woods at the Learning Center Campground. A puppet play for all ages by two Chicago Theater Icons, Blair Thomas and singer-song writer, Michael Smith.

selfish giant

Original puppets and music tell the story of a grumpy old giant who forbids the children in his village from playing in his beautiful garden. After the children are locked out, the trees and flowers refuse to grow and the garden plunges into an eternal winter. Then one morning, the children sneak back into the garden, bringing with them the joyous rebirth of spring.

Farm Travel! Travel the farm with your Farm Fun Passport on July 19! We’ll stamp your passport as you take a hayride through the fields, and you meet the goats, pigs, and chickens.

Stop by the Learning Center for a delicious taste of farm-fresh goat’s milk ice cream.

goat milk

12:30 to 1:30 ; Potluck: please bring a large dish to pass

* The dishes at past open houses have always been phenomenal, but sometimes we run short on food–this is not to be on a farm that is all about food! Please bring a dish that will serve at least 15.

* Farmer John & the hard-working crew say that more desserts would be appreciated.

* Please bring the recipe that goes with your dish; recipes accompanying dishes are a hit. Put your name & your delivery site on the recipe, so admirers can track you down & lavish you with praise. (10 copies on 3×5 cards would be great.)

* Please bring your own place settings & beverage. We furnish some tables and chairs. Please consider bringing a blanket on which to picnic, so we don’t have to provide so many chairs.

1:45 to 2:30: CSA Meeting Offer suggestions about food & farming.

2:45 to 3:30: The Selfish Giant Puppet Play in the Woods at the Learning Center Campground

3 pm to 4 pm: One More Hayride

Warmly,

Farmer John, The Farm Crew and the Staff of the Angelic Organics Learning Center

Box Contents

Please Note: This summary is written before you receive your box—please be aware that some guesswork is involved. As always, be sure to thoroughly wash all of your vegetables

Lettuce
Kale
A Sweet Onion
Carrots
Cucumbers
Fennel
Summer Squash/Zucchini
Cabbage
Celery
Savory

What’s available in the U-Pick Garden